2015 Beckman Symposium   

Jeff Hasty, PhD

Presentation Date:
August-8-2014

Presenter:
Jeff Hasty, PhD

Title:
Engineered Genetic Clocks: From Clocks and Biopixels to Stealth Delivery

Institution:
University of California, San Diego

Department:
Departments of Molecular BIology and Bioengineering, BioCircuits Institute

Description:

This talk will focus on our ongoing development of genetic oscillators along with recent progress in transitioning to applications related to drug delivery. I will first summarize our understanding of design considerations; we have found that a small time delay and enzymatic protein decay are crucial in the construction of a core oscillator with simple negative feedback, while positive feedback serves to regularize intracellular oscillations and increase the parameter space for cycling. I will then describe clock synchronization using both autoinducer and redox signaling as quorum sensing mechanisms. Microfluidic devices are used to show the collective synchronization of sub-millimeter colonies, while spatiotemporal waves are observed at millimeter scales due to limits set by the diffusive speed of the autoinducer molecule. I will then show how the synergistic coupling of redox and autoinducer signaling can be used to synchronize thousands of "biopixel" colonies over centimeter length scales. I will conclude with recent work on engineering bacteria for the stealth and pulsatile delivery of gene products to tumors.

BIO:

Jeff Hasty received his Ph.D. in physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1997, where he worked with Kurt Wiesenfeld. He was a postdoc with Jorge Vinals at the Supercomputing Research Institute ('97-'98), and a postdoctoral fellow with Jim Collins in the Applied BioDynamics Lab at Boston University ('98-'01). Somewhere during his postdoctoral stay at Boston University, he mutated into a hybrid computational/molecular biologist. He is currently at the University of California, San Diego, where he is a Professor in the Departments of Molecular Biology and Bioengineering, and the Director of the BioCircuits Institute. His main interest is the design and construction of synthetic gene-regulatory and signaling networks.


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